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Technology in the classroom can improve primary mathematics

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There’s much more to mathematics than computation, and that’s where more contemporary technologies can improve primary mathematics.
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Catherine Attard, Western Sydney University

Many parents are beginning to demand less technology use in the primary classroom due to the amount of screen time children have at home. This raises questions about whether technology in the classroom helps or hinders learning, and whether it should be used to teach maths.

Blaming the calculator for poor results

We often hear complaints that children have lost the ability to carry out simple computations because of the reliance on calculators in primary schools. This is not the case. In fact, there has been very little research conducted on the use of calculators in classrooms since the 80’s and 90’s because they are not a significant feature of primary school maths lessons. When calculators are used in primary classrooms, it’s usually to help children develop number sense, to investigate number patterns and relationships, or to check the accuracy of mental or written computation.

There is also evidence that children become more flexible in the way they compute through the use of calculators. It allows them to apply their knowledge of place value and other number related concepts rather than using a traditional algorithm.

The Australian Curriculum promotes a strong focus on the development of numeracy, including the development of estimation and mental computation. These are skills that children need in order to use calculators and other technologies efficiently.

The curriculum also promotes the thinking and doing of mathematics (referred to as “proficiencies”) rather than just the mechanics. There’s much more to mathematics than computation. That’s where more contemporary technologies can improve primary mathematics.

The importance of technology in learning maths

The use of digital technologies in the primary mathematics classroom is not an option. The Australian Curriculum and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has made it mandatory for teachers to incorporate technologies in all subject areas. Fortunately, schools have access to more powerful, affordable devices than ever before. Importantly, these are the same devices that many children already have access to at home, providing an opportunity to bridge the gap between the mathematics at school and their lives outside the classroom.

Literature around digital technologies and mathematics suggest new technologies have potentially changed teaching and learning, providing opportunities for a shift of focus from a traditional view to a more problem-solving approach. This notion is supported by research that claims the traditional view of mathematics that was focused on memorisation and rote learning is now replaced with one that has purpose and application.

When used well, technology can improve student engagement with mathematics and assists in improving their understanding of mathematical concepts.

In a recent research evaluation of the Matific digital resources, the findings were positive. The students found that they enjoyed using the digital resource on iPads and computers, and went from thinking about mathematics as something to be tolerated or endured to something that is fun to learn. An added bonus was that the children voluntarily started to use their screen time at home to do maths. Pre- and post-test data also indicated that the use of the technology contributed to improved mathematics results.

How technology is used in the classroom

Many would consider that the use of mobile devices in maths would consist of simple game playing. A search of the App Store reveals tens of thousands of supposedly educational maths games, creating a potential app trap for teachers who might spend hours searching through many low- quality apps. Although playing games can have benefits in terms of building fluency, they don’t usually help children learn new concepts. Luckily, there’s much that teachers can and are doing with technology.

The following are some of the different ways teachers are using technology:

Show and tell apps, such as Explain Everything, EduCreations or ShowMe, allow students to show and explain the solution to a mathematical problem using voice and images

– Flipped learning, where teachers use the technology to replace traditional classroom instruction. YouTube videos or apps that provide an explanation of mathematical concepts are accessed by students anywhere and anytime

– Subscription based resource packages such as Matific which provide interactive, game-based learning activities, allow the teacher to set activities for individual students and keep track of student achievement

– Generic apps (camera, Google Earth, Google Maps, Geocaching) that allow students to explore mathematics outside the classroom.

The ConversationJust as the world has changed, the mathematics classroom has also changed. Although technology is an integral part of our lives, it shouldn’t be the only resource used to teach maths. When it comes to technology in the classroom, it’s all about balance.

Catherine Attard, Associate Professor, Mathematics Education, Western Sydney University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

For a list of maths apps, click here:

iPad apps and Mathematics 2015

Setting Your Child up for Success with Maths: Tips for Parents

As a new school year approaches, many parents are busy preparing their children to ensure they have the things they need to be successful. School uniforms, books, pens and pencils are important, but what’s even more important is the preparation and support parents can provide to help children succeed academically.

Late in 2016 there were reports from international testing that Australia continues to slip further behind in mathematics when compared to other countries.  So, what can you do about this? Relying on teachers alone won’t fix the problem. There are many things parents can and should do to help their children learn mathematics, particularly before they begin school and during the primary school years. The following is a list of tips for parents that will help them to help their children succeed:

  1. Be positive about maths!

May people openly claim they don’t like maths or they’re not good at it, unintentionally conveying the message that this is okay. Unfortunately, this can have a detrimental effect on the children who hear these messages. In my research on student engagement, children whose parents made similar comments often used the same comments as mathematics became more challenging during the high school years. These behaviours can lead to children opting to stop trying and drop out of mathematics as soon as they can, ultimately limiting their life choices.

As a parent, be conscious of displaying positive attitudes towards mathematics, even when it’s challenging. Adopting what is referred to as a ‘growth mindset’ allows children (and parents) to acknowledge that mathematics is challenging, but not impossible. Rather than saying “I can’t do it” or “it’s too hard”, encourage statements such as “I can’t do it yet” or “let’s work on this together”. If you’re struggling with the mathematics yourself, and finding it difficult to support your child, there are options such as free online courses like Jo Boaler’s YouCubed website (www.youcubed.org), apps such as Khan Academy, or you can seek help from their child’s teacher.

If you choose to use a tutor to help your child, make sure it’s a tutor who knows how to teach for understanding, rather than memorisation. Too often tutoring colleges use the traditional teaching method of drill and practice, which won’t help a struggling student to understand important mathematical concepts. Find a tutor who understands the curriculum and can tailor a program to work alongside what your child is learning at school.

  1. Developing a positive working relationship with teachers

It’s important for parents to work with their child’s teacher to ensure they are able to support the learning of mathematics. This will help the teacher understand the child’s needs and be better able to support the child in the classroom, while at the same time helping the parents support the child at home. Often schools hold information evenings or maths workshops to help explain current teaching methods with few parents turning up. It’s important to attend these events as they are a good opportunity to learn ways to help children with mathematics at home.

  1. Know what maths your child is learning

Mathematics teaching and learning has changed significantly over the last few decades. Unfortunately, many of the older generations still expect children to be learning the same maths in the same way, regardless of how much the world has changed! Access to the mathematics curriculum is free to everyone. Parents have the opportunity to find out what their child should be learning simply by accessing the curriculum online, or talking to their child’s teacher. This can help parents who may have unrealistic expectations of what their child should know and be able to do, and will also help them understand that mathematics is not just about numbers or learning the multiplication tables.

One of the most common complaints when it comes to school mathematics is that children don’t ‘know’ their multiplication tables. Is this important? Yes, it’s still important that children gain fluency when dealing with numbers. However, it’s also important that we don’t just rely on rote learning, or repetition. Children need to understand how the numbers work. In other words, they need to be numerate, and have a flexibility with numbers. Once they understand, then fluency can be built. Using maths games (there are lots of apps that help with this) is a good way of getting children to build up speed with number facts.

  1. Make maths part of everyday activities

Bring maths into daily conversations and activities with your child. After all, there’s maths in everything we do. For example, if you’re cooking you might ask your child to help you measure out ingredients. If you’re shopping, you could have a little competition to see who can make the best estimation of the total grocery bill or perhaps ask your child to work out the amount of change (this may be challenging given that we use credit cards most of the time).

If your child likes to play digital games, download some maths apps so they can use their screen time to learn while having fun at the same time. Alternatively, traditional games can provide opportunities to talk about maths and help your child. Games that use dominoes and playing cards are great for young children as are board games such as Snakes and Ladders or Monopoly. Even non-numerical games such as Guess Who have benefits for mathematics because the promote problem solving and strategic thinking, important mathematical skills.

Parents who can work with their child’s teacher, be proactive in their child’s education, and demonstrate positive attitudes towards mathematics can make a big difference to their child’s success at school. It’s an investment worth making.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Australia’s Declining Maths Results: Who’s Responsible?

Once again, mathematics education is in the spotlight. The most recent TIMMS  and PISA results highlight a decline in Australia’s mathematics achievement when compared to other countries, which will no doubt perpetuate the typical knee jerk reactions of panic and blame. So, what are we doing about this decline? Who’s responsible? Typically, the first to get the blame for anything related to a decline in mathematics are teachers, because they work at the coal face, they spend significant amounts of time with students, and they’re an easy target. But shouldn’t we, as a society that considers it acceptable to proudly claim “I’m not good at maths” (Attard, 2013), take some portion of the blame?

Numeracy and Mathematics education is everyone’s business

As a society, we all need to take some responsibility for the decline in mathematics achievement and more importantly, we all need to collaborate on a plan to change the decline into an incline. From my perspective, there are three groups of stakeholders who need to work together: the general community, the policy makers and school systems that influence and implement the policies, and the teachers.

Let’s start with the general community. It seems everybody’s an expert when it comes to mathematics education because we all experienced schooling in some form. Many say: “I survived rote learning – it didn’t hurt me”. The world has changed, access to information and technology has improved dramatically, and the traditional ‘chalk and talk’ practices are no longer appropriate in today’s classrooms. Many hold a limited view of school mathematics as drill and practice of number facts and computation. Although it’s important that children build fluency, it’s simply not enough. We must promote problem solving and critical thinking within relevant contexts – making the purpose of learning mathematics visible to students. It is, after all, problem solving that forms the core of NAPLAN, TIMSS and PISA tests.

The community pressure for teachers to use text books and teach using outdated methods, along with a crowded curriculum and an implied requirement for teachers to ‘tick curriculum boxes’ causes significant tensions for teachers, particularly in the primary school where they are required to be experts at every subject. If we consider the limited number of hours allocated to mathematics education in teacher education degrees compared with the expectations that all primary teachers suddenly become experts on graduation, then we should understand that teachers need continued support beyond their tertiary education to develop their skills. In addition, rather than focusing on students’ learning, the crowded curriculum  leads them to focus on getting through the curriculum (http://v7-5.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/curriculum/f-10?layout=2#page=1) and this often leads to a ‘back to basics’ approach of text books, work sheets and lots of testing that does not create students who can problem solve, problem pose and problem find.

This is where the policy makers and school systems must come into play by providing support for high quality and sustained professional learning and encouraging primary teachers to gain expertise as specialist mathematics teachers. We already have a strong curriculum that promotes problem solving and critical thinking both through the Proficiencies and through the General Capabilities. The General Capabilities provide teachers with the opportunity to embed mathematics in contextual, relevant and purposeful mathematics. However, teachers need to be supported by all stakeholders, the community and the policy makers, to use these tools and focus less on the teaching of mathematics as a series of isolated topics that make little sense to students.

What can we do?

There are no easy solutions, but one thing is clear. We need to disrupt the stereotypical perceptions of what school mathematics is and how it should be taught. We need to support our teachers and work with them rather than against them. Let’s band together and make some changes that will ultimately benefit the most important stakeholders of all, the children of Australia.

 

 

Attard, C. (2013). “If I had to pick any subject, it wouldn’t be maths”: Foundations for engagement with mathematics during the middle years. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(4), 569-587.

 

Why saying “I’m not good at maths” is just not good enough!

How many times have you heard people say “I’m not good at maths”? Perhaps you’ve said it yourself. Often people make the statement with pride, almost implying it’s ‘cool’ to be bad at maths. Imagine if the same number of people claimed “I’m not good at reading”. I don’t think it would be deemed socially acceptable – in fact, most people would be embarrassed to make that claim. So why is it okay to by openly negative about mathematics? Why do so many in the media openly claim to dislike mathematics, and why is mathematics seen as a domain only accessible to an elite group of ‘smart’ people? Research has proven humans are born numerate, so what happens in those few years when children are in school to make them hate maths?

Firstly, we need to look at what happens in the home. Parents need to think carefully about how they talk to their children about mathematics. Regardless of how they experienced school mathematics and how they perceive mathematics, claims like “I was never good at maths when I was at school” are not helpful. Children notice. Molly, a  Year 6 participant in my PhD study, made this comment when asked about what her family think about mathematics: “My mum doesn’t really like me asking her because she thinks she doesn’t have a maths brain. She thinks that she’s got more of an English brain than anything else.” Not surprisingly, Molly was not the only child who made that kind of comment.

Parents’ negative attitudes or beliefs do have the potential to negatively influence children, particularly when not having a ‘maths brain’ can be used as an excuse for opting out of mathematics in the senior years of schooling. Evidence of this influence on children’s thinking can be seen in this quote, where Kristie, another participant, was describing her friends’ attitudes towards mathematics: “Maybe some just don’t enjoy it the way I do, they just think maybe it’s not their subject. They might enjoy English.”

So what can parents do to promote positive attitudes towards mathematics? Above all, they should never make negative comments about the subject. If you are a parent and you are having difficulty with helping your child, seek help. In the primary years, many schools are happy to provide parent workshops to help parents understand new teaching methods. Workshops could also be held to help parents ‘brush up’ on their own mathematics skills. If your child is in secondary school and the mathematics they are learning requires more than a quick revision, don’t panic. It’s okay to say “I don’t know” or “I don’t remember how to do that” – try and find a way to assist your child in finding an explanation, whether it is by seeking help online, encouraging them to seek help from their teacher, or, if required, finding an appropriate tutor who may be able to provide some remediation. It’s better to seek help early.

One of the challenges with mathematics is that the concepts are hierarchical. That is, if children don’t  don’t develop a deep understanding of foundational topics such as place value, gaps in learning begin to occur. When mathematics becomes more complex, children who struggle with the foundations of mathematics cannot keep up with their peers and fall behind, often leading to negative attitudes, poor self-efficacy, and disengagement.

And now we turn to the classroom. What can teachers do to stop the “I’m not good at maths” comments from perpetuating a fear of mathematics? Firstly, talking to parents about this issue needs to be a priority. Next, think about how you can promote positive attitudes – I’ve written much about engagement and mathematics and there are lots of great teaching and learning ideas on this website and elsewhere. Another comment that we often hear is “when an I ever going to use this?”. It’s a fact that there is mathematics that some of us will never use once we leave school. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t learn it – if we don’t we may be minimising future opportunities. Professor Edward Frenkel (one of my mathematical heroes) claims that school mathematics is often not presented in a way that highlights the connections to our daily lives (check out his video on YouTube). We don’t always have to understand the complex mathematics that lies beneath Facebook, online shopping, traffic systems, etc., but we do need to be aware that mathematics plays a critical role in many aspects of our daily lives, regardless of what we do or where we are from.

Finally, I strongly believe we need to stop allowing those around us, in our lives and in the media, to make such negative statements about mathematics – if we don’t take a stand things will never change, and it’s definitely time for a positive change. Start your school week with this statement: “I love maths!” Feels good, doesn’t it?

Free resources that every teacher, student and parent should know about!

There are two brilliant mathematics resources that I believe everyone should know about and use to improve mathematics in schools and in our community. One is designed for people of all ages, and the other is one of my favourite mathematics problem solving websites. Some of you would have seen and used these two websites. If you haven’t, I would encourage you to take a look – these resources are free and of high quality! Although quite different, these websites have educational resources that access a broad range of mathematics content, and more importantly, the processes of mathematics. That is, the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics proficiencies, or if you live in New South Wales, the Working Mathematically components of the current mathematics curriculum.

Last week I wrote about financial literacy and what it means in the context of mathematics and primary schools. Since then, I have spoken to several more teachers and children at schools in low socio-economic areas as part of my current research project on financial literacy and mathematics. A result of my conversations is that I am even more convinced of the importance of teaching consumer and financial literacy in the classroom and beyond, in the wider community.

Part of my research involves the participating teachers using the existing MoneySmart resources to introduce their students to consumer and financial literacy prior to developing their own context specific units of work. This requirement led to some professional development based on the MoneySmart resources (https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/), which have been funded by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC). Prior to this professional development, almost all of the teachers I have spoken to did not fully understand that financial literacy is much more than being able to recognise currency and the adding and subtracting of dollars and cents. Some teachers also expressed a need to develop their own financial literacy to improve their own financial health.

After exploring the range of resources on the MoneySmart website I am convinced that this resource should be used in every school and community. The website provides educational resources for people of all ages and stages in life and could potentially change lives by promoting the development of healthy consumer and financial habits. It’s not enough that we are promoting financial literacy amongst children – the message needs to spread beyond the school gates, and I believe MoneySmart has the power to do this.

The second free resource that everyone needs to know about is the NRICH mathematics enrichment website (http://nrich.maths.org/teacher-primary), published by the University of Cambridge as part of the Millenium Mathematics Project. I have been using this site for many years now and it continues to improve and evolve. The standard of the mathematics problems on this site are excellent and an added benefit is that there are also many resources that provide professional development for teachers. Although the website is based on the British school curriculum, it aligns quite well with the Australian Curriculum.

The best thing about the NRICH website is that it is based on rich mathematical problem solving and investigation, which lies at the heart of our mathematics curriculum in Australia. The activities can be used in the classroom, for homework (if you have to set homework), and can be accessed by parents who are looking for some mathematics they can do with their children.

So what do these fabulous free resources have in common? Apart from the fact that they’re both free, they promote high quality mathematics education by using either contextual, real-life project based learning or rich tasks that can help children (and adults) learn mathematics in a much more engaging way than traditional text books and worksheets. They also promote the development of skills and understandings that can be applied beyond the mathematics classroom and have the potential to improve life opportunities – that’s got to be a good thing!

Financial Literacy: What does it mean, and how can we teach it in schools and at home?

I am currently working on a research project funded by Financial Literacy Australia that is investigating the use of financial literacy education as a tool to promote primary students’ engagement with mathematics in low socio-economic areas. While working on the project, it has struck me that often we have a simplistic view of what financial literacy for young children means, and how influential it can be in their future lives.

There are many definitions of financial literacy, ranging from “basic money management: budgeting, saving, investing and insuring” (Hogarth, 2002) to definitions that incorporate a more critical perspective, such as that proposed by the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers (AAMT): “enabling people to make informed decisions at the personal level…allowing citizens to properly analyse and make judgements about broader issues such as government policy, the influence of the media and activities of the finance industry” (AAMT, 2010, p.2). In the context of primary schools, financial literacy is much more complex than just teaching children to recognise currency, to add and subtract money amounts, or to be able to estimate the costs of items. It is about learning how to apply a range of mathematical skills and knowledge to consumer related situations in an informed, analytical and critical manner. These skills should be learned in the classroom, and just as importantly, at home.

So why teach mathematics through financial literacy? We know there is an ongoing problem around children disengaging from mathematics, and this often occurs from an early age. One of the biggest causes of students’ disengagement with mathematics is the fact that they fail to see the relevance of mathematics or its applications to real life situations. Added to this, there is concern relating to young people from low socio-economic areas in particular, as presented in a recent report by Thomson (2014):

  • In Australia, 75 per cent of socioeconomically disadvantaged students hold a bank account compared with 89 per cent of advantaged students.
  • “More students from disadvantaged backgrounds than students from an advantaged background responded that they were influenced by advertising in magazines, flyers and newspapers, and by the need to ‘fit in’ when making decisions about spending money” (p. viii).

Teaching mathematics via financial literacy makes sense. By using real-life contexts that involve financial literacy that is age appropriate and interesting to students, we can teach a range of mathematics and numeracy skills. Students are more likely to remember and understand because they have applied them to something they are interested in and something that is relevant to their present lives.

The following is some advice for teachers and parents in relation to promoting mathematics in the context of financial literacy education.

For teachers

In their Position Paper on Consumer and Financial Literacy in Schools (2012) the AAMT note that mathematics teachers need to address the cross-curricular learning in financial literacy though the mathematics curriculum and through “broader concepts and understandings” (p.3) of other key learning areas and in real life situations, with relevant contemporary resources. Such contemporary resources are available from the MoneySmart website (https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/teaching/teaching-resources/teaching-resources-for-primary-schools) at no cost. These resources are an excellent way to begin teaching financial literacy concepts with some units of work specifically designed around mathematics, however, if we want to ensure teaching and learning is truly contextual with the aim of engaging students with mathematics, these units can and should be adjusted to suit the specific needs of the students in your classroom.

Alongside the MoneySmart resources, consider using resources that are familiar to students’ everyday lives. These could include items that are in the news media, shopping catalogues, television commercials etc. Keep watch for interesting photographs or misleading advertisements such as the one above. They are great for instigating mathematical discussions. There is also a range of iPad apps that could be used alongside mathematics and financial literacy explorations, including budgeting apps and supermarket apps. If you like using picture books to introduce and teach concepts, the following website has an extensive list of books relating to financial literacy: http://www.moneyandstuff.info/books.htm

For Parents

Many young children don’t understand where money comes from and it’s important that they begin to develop some understanding of how our economy works, even from a young age (many children believe that money comes out of a hole in a wall). In my research there appears to be a pattern emerging where children whose parents talk to them about money develop an earlier understanding of its importance and are provided with more opportunities to deal with money and make decisions about money. If you have young children, it’s a great time to start their financial literacy and mathematics education. Take opportunities when you are out shopping to either include your child in discussions and decisions where appropriate, or explain financial decisions that are made on their behalf. Talk about the mathematics involved in financial decision-making and where possible, encourage children to make their own financial decisions with pocket money, banking, etc. If you feel you need to improve your own financial literacy first, MoneySmart have fantastic resources for adults too (https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/).

The benefits of engaging children with mathematics through financial literacy are clear. By highlighting the relevance of mathematics to children’s current and future lives through real-life learning contexts relating to money we can better position young children for academic success and success in relation to their future economic lives.

View an interview about financial literacy on Weekend Sunrise on Sunday 26th April 

References

Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers (2012) Position paper on Consumer and Financial Literacy in Schools. retrieved January 2015 from www.aamt.edu.au

Hogarth, J.M. (2002). Financial literacy and family and consumer sciences. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 94, 15-28.

Thomson, Sue. (2014). Financing the future: Australian students’ results in the PISA 2012 Financial Literacy assessment. Victoria: Australian Council for Educational Research.

Woolworths and Dominoes (Part 2): Even more mathematical opportunities for parents and teachers!

My last blog about the marketing promotion being run by Woolworths and Disney Pixar attracted so much interest that I thought I would look deeper into the mathematical potential of the whole campaign. Somehow, the incentive of receiving a domino for every $20 spent seems to be very appealing to consumers, young and old. What is it about these little plastic objects that is so attractive? Perhaps the appealing aspect of the dominoes is the fact that children can actually play with these, as opposed to collections of character cards that are usually given away in such promotions.

So why are the dominoes appealing to teachers like me? My research on student engagement with mathematics has shown that when children have an interest in something, they are more likely to want to learn. They also like to use concrete materials to help them learn – things they can see, touch and manipulate (as opposed to the traditional maths worksheets and textbooks). In the case of Woolworths and dominoes, this is a perfect opportunity for parents and teachers alike to seize this amazing opportunity, take advantage of the hype and do some really good, interesting mathematics!

During the week, as I watched the statistics on my blog increase, I thought I would explore the Woolworths web site and dig around a little. I didn’t find too much of interest, although they have made an effort to publish some very basic educational ideas relating to the dominoes. What I did find, however, was that people are actually selling dominoes on eBay! You can buy whole sets (of characters), individual dominoes of specific characters (some up to $3 each), or unopened dominoes. At this point my head started to hurt…..so many mathematical possibilities! Imagine children investigating the cost of dominoes (in shopping dollars), compared to the apparent worth of dominoes as advertised on eBay. All week I have had fantastic (well, I think they’re fantastic) ideas popping into my head, and these are a few that you might want to try out at home (if you are a parent), or at school, if you are a teacher. I will begin my list with simple tasks for younger children, and finish it with more complex tasks for older children:

  • How many dominoes do you think you could hold in one hand? Try it and see if you were right or wrong. How close were you? What if you could use two hands? How many dominoes can you hold? Is this the same as an adult?
  • How many dominoes have a one dot? Two dot? Three dot pattern?
  • If I lay my dominoes flat, end to end (the short end), how long will my line be? How many dominoes will I need if I wanted to make a flat line that is as long as my foot? My leg? My arm? My body?
  • Keep your character doubles, and use pairs of doubles to play a game of memory.
  • Using the picture side of the dominoes (the characters are numbered), order the dominoes from 1 to 44.
  • Are you missing any dominoes? What numbers are missing and how do you know?
  • Using the picture side of the dominoes, imagine that the number of the character is equivalent to its worth. That is, character number 1 is worth $1, character number 2 is worth $2, etc. What would be the value of your collection? If you had every domino from number 1 to number 44, what is it worth?
  • If I lined up my dominoes so they were standing (like in the photo), what would be the best distance apart (if they’re too close together, you might knock them down accidently).
  • How many (standing) dominoes would you need to make a line of 1 metre? Imagine you needed to make a domino line for one kilometre – can you use the number of dominoes you have to work out how many dominoes you would need? How much would you have to spend at Woolworths to have enough dominoes?
  • How long would it take to knock down a one metre line of standing up dominoes? Who can make the longest line?
  • I received 18 dominoes with my shopping this week. How much did I spend?
  • Do you think the Woolworths marketing campaign has been successful? Design a set of survey questions and conduct some research at your school. Analyse your data and prepare a report that you could send to the Chief Executive Officer of Woolworths.

Of course, there are many more ideas – perhaps there will be a Part 3 blog post over the Easter weekend. Oh, and by the way, Woolworths are giving away ‘double’ dominoes at the moment – this opens up another world of mathematical opportunity!